Carving out time for San Francisco

Moving and entering a new environment always comes with its drawbacks, even when you move to somewhere almost entirely objectively awesome like California.

I’ve lived in Chicago for about five years before moving to the Bay Area about four months ago. Right now it’s February – the coldest time of the year in the Midwest. So I am thankful I’m in a warmer climate, away from the bone-chilling polar vorteces and snowamageddons.

But I would be lying if I said I didn’t miss some things about living in Chi-Town.

I think most of the time the world is divided into people who love big cities and those who hate them.

Stargazing in tranquil parts of Bay Area

Stars, moon, comets. Whenever I look up and gaze at the sky, I’m humbled by the vastness of the universe. I love that feeling of insignificance you get when you look up.

Although for some, thinking of our planet as a tiny, meaningless glimpse in the abyss of, well, mostly nothing (or as some also call it dark matter), may be depressing, I’m a sucker for it.

I just love it when the universe puts me in my place.

“Stop worrying about your stupid problems, Alex,” the sky whispers lovingly when I look up after an overwhelming day.…

Flatland resident relishes in hiking

One of the most exciting things for me about living in the Bay Area are the endless mountains and hills.

I’m new to uneven horizons. I’ve always lived in areas where the land is flat no matter which way you look: Moscow, South Florida and then Chicago.

During some early mornings in South Florida, clouds would float very close to the ground, and the sun would hit them in a way that created an illusion of rugged mountains somewhere in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean.

I remember being fooled by that illusion on occasion as I looked out of the window of my high school’s bus, still trying to wake up.